AMPS ROUTLEDGE PEDAGOGY AWARD

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Winners: Milagros Zingoni & Magnus Feil

Year: 2021
Institutions: University of Tennessee-Knoxville & Arizona State University
Title: Pedagogy + INTERVENTION – CUMULUS, an inhabitable storm
Format: Book Chapter

Book Title: Emerging Practices in Architectural Pedagogy

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Abstract

The design-build studios propose the opportunity for praxis, where theory and practice intersects, they teach real life skills with focus on learning processes and collaborative design skills. EDIT studio is a participatory design build pedagogy that adds community engagement as the first phase of the complex design build pedagogy. Design build curriculums have developed in the last forty years in Architecture program in North America. Among the most prominently design build programs are the work of Steve Badanes from Jersey Devil and Neighborhood design-build, Samuel Mockbee and his work with Rural Studio, Richard Kroeker’s Freelab and Brian Makay-Lyons’ Ghostlab, both of them in Canada at Dalhousie University, and most recently the architecture programs participating in the Solar Decathlon Competition. Community engaged practices have originally emerged in urban planning and they are now part of many arts initiatives to create place making. Within interior design and interior architecture programs, the pedagogical opportunities for design build curriculum are at the early stages, they are often referred as fabrication, or installations and they often lack of community engagement during the design process. This paper presents and applied EDIT studio, a pedagogy that involves engagement, design, implementation and transformation that proposes a participatory collaboration with youth in the community as the first phase of the design process. It discusses Cumulus, a process and product done in Fall 2018 with ten graduate students in interior architecture and one hundred twenty kids from a local Title I school. The studio also involved a cross disciplinary collaboration with thirty four junior students in industrial design. It describes the contexts and development of a participatory-design-build funded studio done in a Research I university in the southwest of the United States exploring the collaborations with multiple audiences, youth, undergraduate and graduate design students and across disciplines.

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Winner: Sean Burns

Year: 2020
Institution: Ball State University
Title: Collaborative Thinking Through the Dynamics of Site and Architecture in Design Education
Format: Book Chapter

Book Title: Progressive Studio Pedagogy: Examples from Architecture and Allied Design Fields

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Abstract

Designing for a complex world requires architects to think critically, creatively, and collaboratively. To support the development of this skillset, the atmosphere of the design studio in architectural education challenges students to develop ideas creatively and critically reflect upon their conceptual designs for given projects. In design education, thinking collaboratively does not need to be solely defined by the sharing of ideas and information among peers, but instead can be applied to how architecture and its site can collectively inform one another throughout the design process to achieve a desired solution. Often, students are taught to sequentially operate within the design process by observing, recording, and then responding to it conditions with an architectural intervention. This procedure, while beneficial in teaching students to acknowledge and appreciate the contextual environment for their design, can be misguided as it emphasizes the site as a given, invariable constraint that is static and impermeable in nature. Architectural design involves a mediation of the designer’s intentions with the site. As such, students should be encouraged to consider architecture and the conditions of the site as malleable, accommodating bodies. This paper presents a series of projects, introduced to students in their second-year of study, that encouraged students to break the sequence of observe, record, and respond to allow site and architecture to be responsively in dialogue with one another throughout the design process. At the outset of each project, students were asked to blur the demarcations of architecture and site, among the earth and beyond to the sky, towards discovering ways in which the architecture and its contextual surroundings might respect, respond, and support one another to cultivate a desired user experience. These exercises offered students an avenue to creatively and critically maneuver the design process while promoting collaborative thinking between architecture and its environment.

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Acknowledgement:

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AMPS would like to thank and acknowledge the work and insights offered by its academic peer reviewers and awards committee in the selection process for this award.

 

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